How To Make Facebook Better

Billionaire entrepreneur Mark Cuban has been a bit obsessed with Facebook ever since he realized that the company was charging to make sure that fans of his basketball team would see the team’s Facebook posts. It’s a realization that has irked many as the world’s largest social network rolled out its Promoted Posts to people.

The fact is that the average Facebook user has over 120 friends and likes another 100 groups or pages.

This means the news feed generally moves very quickly pushing down updates almost immediately. In an effort to improve engagement, Facebook has developed Edgerank which pushes the updates your most likely to engage with to the top of your feed. It also pushes Promoted Posts to the top, to monetize the tremendous amount of time about a billion people around the world spend on the site. If you don’t interact with a friend or a page, you’ll eventually stop seeing their posts in your feed.

Facebook isn’t like email. You can’t expect every friend to see every post. Depending on how many friends you have and how active they are, they are probably much more likely to see your status update than a tweet—which fly, by usually only seen by a tiny fraction of your followers.

Cuban’s main complaint is that Facebook doesn’t understand what its business is. He says the site is a “time waster” like television. For that reason, he thinks users would be better are determining what they’d like to engage with than Facebook is—if the site would only make it easier to “unlike” things and sort through the feed.

Cuban is right about what the site’s value is—a way to pass time enjoyably. But it does offer a more authentic, unique, interactive experience than TV in that it makes your friends and family your entertainment. If relationships are easily made and broken the site becomes a little less like life. It’s that relationship to reality that gives Facebook its advantage over old media. Still the accumulation of likes and relationships on the site creates your experience but it also makes it messier and less enjoyable if you aren’t getting to the good stuff fast.

In a recent survey we found that about 6 out of 10 Facebook users think the site as good or better than it has been. That left 4 out of 10 who think it’s worse.

So does Marc Cuban have a point? Could you do a better job managing your feed than Facebook?

The reason the site has taken it upon its self to manage our feeds is because it knows that most people won’t take the time to do so. They’ll just stop using when it gets boring.

But if you’re reading this, you care more than the average user. So here are a few suggestions to improve your Facebook experience.

1. Unlike, unlike, unlike.
If you’re on Facebook and see something that annoys you—like spam or a not safe for work posting, go ahead and unlike the person or page. It takes a second, you have to go to profile, click on the wheel thing and select “Unfriend” or “Unlike”. You can always reconnect later. But unless you get in the practice or trimming your feed, you’re never going to improve your experience.

2. Switch your feed view from “Top Stories” to “Most Recent”.
This won’t guarantee that you’ll see all the posts from all your friends in linear order. Facebook’s algorithm seems to make that impossible. But it will prevent Facebook from controlling your feed entirely.

3. Use “Close Friends”.
On the left-hand column of your Facebook feed, you’ll see a Friends category. You may have to click on “More” to get to it. Click on “Close Friends” and Facebook will give you suggestions on who to add to this list. Only add the people you’re most interested in following. This won’t improve your feed, but Facebook will give you a notification when one of your favorite friends post. With this feature, you don’t need to worry about missing the posts from the people you care about most.



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Why You May Want to Disable Location Services for Facebook

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POLL: What Changes To Twitter Would You Like To See?

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