5730523107_969702e067

F-Secure’s Business Protection Impresses Top Analyst

5730523107_969702e067At F-Secure, we not only aim to protect our customers with the best security possible, we also want to do it in the smartest possible way. And here’s some good news: Globally renowned Forrester Research has looked at small business and enterprise client security vendors around the world and found that we’re succeeding in both areas.

We’re proud to be featured in The Forrester Wave™, Endpoint Security Q1 2013 as top-ranked in Strategy. Forrester Research Inc. called us a Strong Performer and gave us the highest score among all vendors for our product roadmap and strategy.

What makes our approach to securing the workplace so appealing is that we don’t see ourselves just offering our clients security software—we take away the worry of securing your office and let our professionals do the job. I recently had a discussion with an end customer of ours in the media industry. He told me that he’s not really interested in what happens in the background and how our products work – he only wants to know that the level of protection is sufficient. And this is not a unique case; we’ve heard the same story from many of our customers.

This simple, breakthrough approach also makes it easier and more affordable to deploy the award-winning security we’ve been providing for more than two decades.

“We think this vision is closely aligned with the bigger climate change where IT all over the world is moving to procuring services rather than products,” Forrester said.

Forrester also praised our rootkit detection and DeepGuard, which we’re especially proud of. Deepguard anticipates threats using heuristical, behavioral and reputation-based technologies.

The other morning when I was commuting to the office in freezing cold weather, I started thinking about layered protection – a term we use to describe the way our protection technology is built. Security is a bit like weather; we forecast it to be able to be prepared. And the colder it gets, the more layers we need to protect us. It is not always that we need all the layers we’ve got at the back of our closet, but we still need to have them come the winter frosts – and the same logic goes for the different layers included in our security products.

Just as clothing companies develop better materials, we continuously develop new technologies to protect our customers

Forrester credited our Labs’ research and gave our Client Security credit for performance, anti-malware detection and customer feedback.

The best news is that they evaluated us even before our new Software Updater tool, which makes it easy to keep your network patched and protected, was released. And that’s a big part of how we try to be smart—by always improving.

Here are some of our tips on securing your business network. And you can find out more about our corporate service portfolio here.

[Photo by Sean MacEntee via Flickr]

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Ask Erka Koivunen anything for #CyberSecMonth

European Cyber Security Month (or National Cyber Security Awareness Month as it’s known in the US) is just around the corner. And considering the recent disclosure of Yahoo’s massive data breach, it seems like a good time for companies to give some consideration to their cyber security policies. One person glad to see it arrive is F-Secure Cyber Security Advisor Erka Koivunen. Erka, who’s advised people, companies, and even governments on how to protect themselves from online threats for years, wants to let people know that security is more than relying on the latest technologies or devices for protection. It’s just as much about processes and practices as it is about technology. That’s why Erka is participating in an “Ask me Anything” session on Reddit called “How to Create a Culture of Security.” Erka will answer your questions about what you, your colleagues, and your boss need to know about being hacked. Plus, Erka will be joined by Cosmin Ciobanu from the European Union Agency for Network and Information Security (better known as ENISA, the organized of European Cyber Security Month) to provide some additional insights on how to improve security in workplaces around Europe. This will be Erka’s second AMA, having previously fielded a range of questions about online privacy in an AMA conducted last Data Privacy Day. The AMA session will kick-off at 8 AM EST/3 PM EET on October 4th. We’ll update this blog post with the link as soon as it’s available, so check back here so you don’t miss out.

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Want to become a Cyber Security Expert?

Cyber security is becoming a huge industry. After all, the data breaches, cyber espionage, and ransomware infections you read about the news are hardly good things. Companies are now making big investments in putting a stop to these problems. That means jobs. And cyber security jobs are generally pretty good. One recent study points out that cyber security jobs pay almost 10% more than other IT positions. And because more companies are hiring more cyber security specialists, and because the cyber security industry is expanding rapidly, it’s a good time to start thinking about getting into the field. Cyber Security Base with F-Secure is a course series created by F-Secure and the University of Helsinki. The series aims to get potential cyber security experts into the workforce by giving them the basic training they need for entry-level cyber security positions. The course series, conducted through the University of Helsinki’s MOOC, is open to the general public as well as existing IT students. The material will be taught in English and can be completed entirely online, making it useful for people all over the globe. There are no formal prerequisites required for enrollment. However, a basic understanding of coding, how the internet works, and internet security are necessary to understand the course content. Participants can expect to learn about the following topics: Building secure software systems Using tools to analyze flaws in software EU legislation relevant to cyber security Performing risk and threat assessments on existing systems The course series is well suited to people with an active interest in information technology, students currently pursuing a computer science degree, or current IT professionals interested in specializing in cyber security. Participants that perform well and complete the series will have the skills necessary to work as junior consultants in the cyber security industry. Cyber Security Base with F-Secure begins on October 25th, 2016. Anyone interested in the course series can sign up here for updates and other news.

September 11, 2016
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ransomware gangs, cybercrime unicorn

Could Criminals Make A Billion Dollars With Ransomware?

Bitcoin has not only changed the economics of cybercrime by providing crooks with an encrypted, nearly anonymous payment system autonomous from any central bank. It's also changed researchers' ability to track how much money criminals are making. "Bitcoin is based on Blockchain, and Blockchain is a public ledger of transactions. So all Bitcoin transactions are public," explains Mikko Hyppönen, F-Secure's Chief Research Officer. "Now, you don’t know who is who. But we can see money moving around, and we can see the amounts." Every victim of Ransomware -- malware that encrypts files and demands a payment for their release -- is given a unique wallet to transfer money into. Once paid, some ransomware gangs move the bitcoins to a central wallet. "We've been monitoring some of those wallets," Mikko says. "And we see Bitcoins worth millions and millions. We see a lot of money." Watching crooks rake in so much money, tax-free, got him thinking: "I began to wonder if there are in fact cybercrime unicorns." A cybercrime unicorn? (View this as a PDF) A tech unicorn is a privately held tech company valued at more than a billion dollars. Think Uber, AirBNB or Spotify -- only without the investors, the overhead and oversight. (Though the scam is so profitable that some gangs actually have customer service operations that could rival a small startup.) "Can we use this comparison model to cybercrime gangs?" Mikko asks. "We probably can’t." It's simply too hard to cash out. Investors in Uber have people literally begging to buy their stakes in the company. Ransomware gangs, however, have to continually imagine ways to turn their Bitcoin into currency. "They buy prepaid cards and then they sell these cards on Ebay and Craigslist," he says. "A lot of those gangs also use online casinos to launder the money." But even that's not so easy, even if the goal is to sit down at a online table and attempt to lose all your money to another member of your gang. "If you lose large amounts of money you will get banned. So the gangs started using bots that played realistically and still lose – but not as obviously." Law enforcement is well aware of extremely alluring economics of this threat. In 2015, the FBI’s Internet Crime Complaint Center received "2,453 complaints identified as Ransomware with losses of over $1.6 million." In 2016, hardly has a month gone by without a high-profile case like Hollywood Presbyterian Medical Center paying 40 Bitcoin, about $17,000 USD at the time, to recover its files. And these are just the cases we're hearing about. The scam is so effective that it seemed that the FBI was recommending that victims actually pay the ransom. But it turned out their answer was actually more nuanced. "The official answer is the FBI does not advise on whether or not people should pay," Sean Sullivan, F-Secure Security Advisor, writes. "But if victims haven’t taken precautions… then paying is the only remaining alternative to recover files." What sort of precautions? For Mikko, the answer obvious. "Backups. If you get hit you restore yesterday’s backup and carry on working. It could be more cumbersome if it’s not just one workstation, if your whole network gets hit. But of course you should always have good, up to date, offline backups. And 'offline' is the key!" What's also obvious is that too few people are prepared when Ransomware hits. Barring any disruptions to the Bitcoin market, F-Secure Labs predicts this threat will likely persist, with even more targeted efforts designed to elicit even greater sums.  If you end up in an unfortunate situation when your files are held hostage, remember that you're dealing with someone who thinks of cybercrime as a business. So you can always try to negotiate. What else do you have to lose?

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