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How we go deeper to protect you from new threats

Read our whitepaper about F-Secure DeepGuard, our proactive protection against new and emerging threats. Read it here.

You may know that F-Secure won the Best Protection Award – twice in a row. But if you’ve ever wondered about how we actually go about protecting our customers from malware, this post is for you. We do it by going deeper. Let me explain.

Traditional antivirus software looks at the outward characteristics of files to see if the characteristics match those of previously seen malware files. If they match, the antivirus program knows to block the file.

For this system to work, antivirus labs need to have a sample of the malware file in order to analyze its characteristics so they know exactly what they need to block.

This is a very effective method for blocking most malware seen to date, and this is how F-Secure protects you from existing malware we already know about.

Of course, it takes time for antivirus labs to receive a malware sample and analyze it so we can effectively block it. That means brand new malware created just in the past few days or weeks that we haven’t yet had a chance to analyze, can get past traditional scanning systems.

Complicating the issue, cybercriminals who create malware nowadays are very clever at avoiding detection by antivirus programs. One way they do this is by creating new, different variants of their malware. These variants are still the same malware at the core, but they appear new and different on the outside. Like a criminal who dresses in disguise to avoid being recognized, the malware file is disguised to avoid detection by antivirus software. There are automated malware creation kits that do this for the cybercriminals, making it easy to spit out thousands of new variants.

To be able to protect from brand new malware, then, and to protect from all the new variants of existing malware, it is crucial for F-Secure’s software to be able to detect a malware file even before our Labs have ever received a sample of it.

So how do we block malware strains we’ve never seen? We examine not just a file’s outward characteristics, but we also monitor its behavior for suspicious activity. Like I said, malware can change in appearance and characteristics. But one thing never changes: Malware always does malicious things. So if we’re not sure if a file is malicious or not, we watch to see how the program behaves.

We call our behavioral analysis technology DeepGuard. DeepGuard observes a program’s behavior and prevents potentially harmful actions from successfully completing. This way, we can block even brand new malware files that haven’t yet been analyzed. And we can stop malicious files that are disguised as something else.

When the user opens a file, any file, DeepGuard instantaneously checks for suspicious behavior, and if it finds something, it will block the program from launching. Since some malware hide their malicious behavior until after the program launches, DeepGuard still continues monitoring programs while they are running, watching for and blocking suspicious actions.

DeepGuard is a feature of F-Secure’s products, working in tandem with our other protection layers (browsing protection, traditional signature scanning, file reputation analysis, and prevalence rate checking) to provide the very best protection. Our newest version, DeepGuard 5 with exploit protection, has already been rolled out, so customers with the latest versions of F-Secure products are already benefiting from the latest technology.

And that’s how we protect you.

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What You Need to Know About the Yahoo Hack

Reports that half a billion Yahoo accounts were hacked in 2014 "by a state-sponsored actor" were confirmed today by the tech giant. This hack of "names, email addresses, telephone numbers, birth dates, encrypted passwords and, in some cases, security questions" is the largest in the company's history and one of the most consequential breaches of all time. Our security advisor Sean Sullivan told CNN what Yahoo users need to know right now: [youtube https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kO-70yKF4bE] He also gave a longer interview to Data Breach Today about the wider implications of the hack. The most important takeaway from this attack is you should always use an extra layer of protection -- in this case Yahoo's two-factor authentication on all your accounts -- and never reuse any important password. Even though Yahoo's passwords stored your passwords with encryption, it's still possible for criminals to get access to them, especially if they are weak. A former Yahoo employee told Reuters that the answers to security questions were deliberately left unencrypted to help catch fake accounts more easily because fake accounts that used the same answers over and over. Sean always uses nonsense answers for so-called security questions so they aren't guessable by anyone who knows him or follows him on social media. He recommends you do the same. So what should you do now? Sean recommends you "walk, not run" to your Yahoo account to disable your security questions and change your password -- and change them on any other site where you've used them to something unique. Make sure you create non-human passwords -- not patterns like yahoo1985. Make them long and difficult to remember. If they're between 20 and 32 characters, they are nearly uncrackable, as our senior researcher Jarno Niemelä recommends. And to deal with all that complexity, use a password manager like our F-Secure KEY, which is free on one device. You can also store your nonsense answers to your security questions in there. Then turn on two-factor authentication, if you haven't already. If you're wondering who might have carried out such a massive attack, Sean does have a hypothesis. [Image by Christian Barmala | Flickr]

September 23, 2016
BY 
android_wi-fi

How to Create a Portable Hotspot on Android with VPN on

Many Android users (myself included) have long found it annoying that creating a working portable hotspot is not possible while using a VPN on the device that shares the connection.  From the user interface to the lines of code that power the app behind it, a driving principle of designing Freedome has always been to make the kind of VPN that only makes your online experience better, without hindering it in any way. Tethering with VPN is now possible This is why we are extremely happy - both personally and for our users - to announce that our new Android release (out now on Google Play) makes it possible to have Freedome turned on while sharing your connection with other devices. We are also the first (as far as we know) major VPN provider to make this happen. Instructions on setting up a portable hotspot The new update automatically allows you to create a portable hotspot with Freedome VPN, so the instructions are fairly simple. Download Freedome VPN on your Android Turn on the portable hotspot feature from your Android settings Keeping it simple, as usual! A note on privacy It’s worth noting for the sake of your privacy that the tethered device’s traffic will NOT go through the VPN tunnel of the device sharing the connection. According to Freedome Product Development Director Harri Kiljander: “Android does not allow tethered devices access to the VPN tunnel. This is a deliberate choice forced by Android for security reasons. For instance, when using VPN to access your employer’s network, they might not want your friends and family there. Also a VPN tunnel shared with others wouldn’t really be a private network anymore” In other words, remember to use Freedome on laptops and any other devices you connect to your own hotspots with. If you have any questions, drop us a line on Twitter. Enjoy!

September 23, 2016
BY 
webcam

QUICK TIP: Change the Default Passwords on Your Webcams and Baby Monitors

If you don't want to read the manual for the new Wi-Fi-connected device you just installed in your home, do yourself a favor and at least check how to change the default password. A new report finds that more than 100,000 devices in the United Kingdom alone could be possibly be accessed by peeping strangers. How is this possible? "Two words," explains F-Secure security advisor Sean Sullivan. "Default settings." Most consumers don't seem to imagine that their baby monitor, web cam of Wi-Fi router might be targeted by a hacker. "That’s called security through obscurity and it just does not work," Sean explains. "There are 'deep-web' search engines --such as Shodan -- that routinely scan for devices on the Internet. And just about anybody can find interesting things there that shouldn’t be publicly accessible but are." Often all online intruders need to do is type in the password that the manufacture sent the device out with. "You need to change the webcam’s password to something complex and unique," he says. "Don’t worry about having to type it all the time, you’ll probably only need to configure the associated mobile app once. And then the app will remember the password for you." This one simple step will greatly reduce your risk of having your devices hacked. Still many of us won't do it. The time to get rid of this terrible habit of leaving default passwords untouched is now, before our homes become so overrun by Wi-Fi-connected devices that hackers begin to devote serious resources to this sort of intrusion and possibly find some convenient way to monetize it. So don't let your fear of not being able to remember the passwords for all these devices become the weak link in your security. "Once you’ve set your secure password, store it someplace safe for future use," Sean says. He suggests a using a password safe like F-Secure KEY or a piece of paper in a secure location in your home. Just don't store it anywhere in sight of a webcam that still is using its default password. [Image by DAVID BURILLO | Flickr]

September 22, 2016