Facebook-Open-Graph

Here’s how Facebook’s Open Graph search could get you in trouble

cautionHave you played with Facebook’s Open Graph search yet?

Facebook’s new search tool is now available to all American users. The rest of the world still has to request its preview here.

Your search bar is now much more prominent in the interface and you should expect it to start playing a much bigger role in how people use the site. The tool mixes a little bit of fun with a little bit of creepiness. And while it’s definitely more useful that Facebook’s old search, it could get you in some trouble.

The good news is that the search respects your privacy settings. The bad news is a lot of people don’t seem to be that careful with their privacy settings.

We tested out these searches and were shocked by how many many profiles actually came up:

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How do you know if you’re protected from embarrassing searches?

We’ve made it easy to check. You can use our Safe Profile Beta app and get your privacy score and recommendations now.

Or you can check manually by clicking on the lock on the upper right corner of any Facebook page for “Privacy shortcuts”.

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Click on “Who can see my stuff?” then “What do other people see on my timeline?”

You’ll see what’s available to the “Public” your “Friends” or a specific person could find as they search for you.

If you’re not happy with anything that may come up, here’s an excellent guide for locking your profile down.

Open Graph search makes the information on your “About” page as well as the privacy settings of your “Friends”, “Photos” and “Likes” more important than ever. So be sure to check out the first four sections of this guide.

And — to be extra safe — I’m going to remind you to run Safe Profile beta, again. And if you do, let us know what score you got in the comments.

Cheers,

Jason

[Image by Eugene Zemlyanskiy via Flickr.com]

 

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