Nothing to hide, nothing to fear: How Britain has sleepwalked into a surveillance state

Privacy

The issue of mass government surveillance may have taken a back seat to other headlines lately, but the new Edward Snowden documentary is bringing it to light once more. CITIZENFOUR, the Laura Poitras film documenting the moments Edward Snowden handed over classified documents detailing the mass indiscriminate and illegal invasions of privacy by the US’s National Security Agency, is getting rave reviews ahead of its world premiere.

The film is already prescreening in the UK, and along with that, F-Secure’s UK office is publishing a research report that highlights the growing concern of the public – specifically, the British public – with mass surveillance. The Nothing to Hide, Nothing to Fear? report centers on the concern about surveillance being undertaken by the British government on its own people, as well as foreign nationals.

The concerns are justified, as Snowden himself in recent comments warned that the British Government is even worse than its American counterparts, since the founding fathers of the US enshrined in law certain rights which the Brits – with no written constitution – cannot claim.

Research* commissioned for the report shows that 86% of Brits do not agree with mass surveillance. Snowden’s leaks last year highlighted the extent to which Western intelligence agencies are snooping on the general populace, including their emails, phone calls, web searches, social media interactions and geo-location. And when you consider the fact that the UK has 5.9 million closed-circuit TV cameras (one for every 11 people, as opposed to one informant per 65 people in the Stasi-controlled East German state), the extent to which Britain has fallen into being a surveillance state becomes shockingly clear.

The UK government, of course, insists that indiscriminate surveillance will protect national security. However, the UK’s Regulation of Investigatory Powers Act (RIPA) contravenes Article 12 of the Human Rights Act: “No one shall be subjected to arbitrary interference with his privacy, family, home or correspondence.”

“We are in unchartered territory and we appear to have sleepwalked here,” said Allen Scott, managing director of F-Secure UK & Ireland. “Little by little, our rights to privacy have been eroded and many people don’t even realise the extent to which they are being monitored. This isn’t targeted surveillance of suspected criminals and terrorists – this is monitoring the lives of the population as a whole.”

With the future use of this data uncertain, the British people are showing their concerns. The research showed that 78% of respondents are concerned with the consequences of having their data tracked. This concern will only increase as more privacy-infringing schemes pervade UK government departments, offering up more personal data for GCHQ, the British intelligence agency, to use.

Be sure to check out CITIZENFOUR once it hits your part of the world. And if you’re in the UK, you can be among the first to see it – see pre-screening venues here: https://citizenfourfilm.com/

 

READ THE REPORT: Nothing to Hide, Nothing to Fear?

 

See more of what Brits think about surveillance in our infographic:

141017 Mass Surveillance Infographic

 

 

 

*Research conducted by Vital Research & Statistics on behalf of F-Secure. 2,000 adult respondents. 10-13th October 2014.

 

 

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