5 things you need to know about securing our future

Privacy, Security

“Securing the future” is a huge topic, but our Chief Research Officer Mikko Hypponen narrowed it down to the two most important issues is his recent keynote address at the CeBIT conference. Watch the whole thing for a Matrix-like immersion into the two greatest needs for a brighter future — security and privacy.

To get started here are some quick takeaways from Mikko’s insights into data privacy and data security in a threat landscape where everyone is being watched, everything is getting connected and anything that can make criminals money will be attacked.

1. Criminals are using the affiliate model.
About a month ago, one of the guys running CTB Locker — ransomware that infects your PC to hold your files until you pay to release them in bitcoin — did a reddit AMA to explain how he makes around $300,000 with the scam. After a bit of questioning, the poster revealed that he isn’t CTB’s author but an affiliate who simply pays for access to a trojan and an exploit-kid created by a Russian gang.

“Why are they operating with an affiliate model?” Mikko asked.

Because now the authors are most likely not breaking the law. In the over 250,000 samples F-Secure Labs processes a day, our analysts have seen similar Affiliate models used with the largest banking trojans and GameOver ZeuS, which he notes are also coming from Russia.

No wonder online crime is the most profitable IT business.

2. “Smart” means exploitable.
When you think of the word “smart” — as in smart tv, smartphone, smart watch, smart car — Mikko suggests you think of the word exploitable, as it is a target for online criminals.

Why would emerging Internet of Things (IoT) be a target? Think of the motives, he says. Money, of course. You don’t need to worry about your smart refrigerator being hacked until there’s a way to make money off it.

How might the IoT become a profit center? Imagine, he suggests, if a criminal hacked your car and wouldn’t let you start it until you pay a ransom. We haven’t seen this yet — but if it can be done, it will.

3. Criminals want your computer power.
Even if criminals can’t get you to pay a ransom, they may still want into your PC, watch, fridge or watch for the computing power. The denial of service attack against Xbox Live and Playstation Netwokr last Christmas, for instance likely employed a botnet that included mobile devices.

IoT devices have already been hijacked to mine for cypto-currencies that could be converted to Bitcoin then dollars or “even more stupidly into Rubbles.”

4. If we want to solve the problems of security, we have to build security into devices.
Knowing that almost everything will be able to connect to the internet requires better collaboration between security vendors and manufacturers. Mikko worries that companies that have never had to worry about security — like a toaster manufacturer, for instance — are now getting into IoT game. And given that the cheapest devices will sell the best, they won’t invest in proper design.

5. Governments are a threat to our privacy.
The success of the internet has let to governments increasingly using it as a tool of surveillance. What concerns Mikko most is the idea of “collecting it all.” As Glenn Glenwald and Edward Snowden pointed out at CeBIT the day before Mikko, governments seem to be collecting everything — communication, location data — on everyone, even if you are not a person of interest, just in case.

Who knows how that information may be used in a decade from now given that we all have something to hide?

Cheers,

Sandra

 

2 Comments

I already subscribe to FSecure so how much more will it cost me if I do download the app. I know it initially says free but later down the page it says try me for free. Alan

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